Why Stephen King’s The Tommyknockers Wasn’t his Worst Book

A lot of people including Stephen King himself believe The Tommyknockers was one of his worst books ever written but was it really?

First, take a look at what The Tommyknockers is about:

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Late Last Night and the Night Before …
… Tommyknockers, tommyknockers, knocking at the door.

Something was happening in Bobbi Anderson’s idyllic small town of Haven, Maine. Something that gave every man, woman, and child in town powers far beyond ordinary mortals. Something that turned the town into a death trap for all outsiders. Something that came from a metal object, buried for millennia, that Bobbi accidentally stumbled across. 

It wasn’t that Bobbi and the other good folks of Haven had sold their souls to reap the rewards of the most deadly evil this side of hell. It was more like a diabolical takeover…an invasion of body and soul–and mind….

Hmm, it seems more science fiction than horror I’d say and which is to believe why many of his fans so used to his horror fiction might be the reason why they didn’t like it. But for me, I am a fan of science fiction, so that might’ve given me a more likeness to it. I really enjoyed the alien aspect and how the entire town was starting to change and become into the alien themselves that were dead inside the crashed UFO hidden in the ground for so many years. I even wish we could have seen more of these extraterrestrial beings and about the planet they were from, but I think Stephen King wanted the story to tell more about how the town was slowly becoming.

Another reason why many fans didn’t like it as much because of the length. The Tommyknockers is over a 800 page novel. This book is one of his more lengthy ones. However, I always seem to enjoy reading his higher word count novels because I just love Stephen King’s writing and I can read on forever.

Being too descriptive was also one of the reasons I’ve read people found The Tommyknockers to be one of his less fond novels. Stephen King is known to be a descriptive writer, so I didn’t really get what was such the fuss about his descriptiveness in this. I love how descriptive he can get; it makes the story and characters feel more real to me. Like as soon as I was done reading The Tommyknockers, every single character he had written in it, I was tricked into believing they were real and not fictional at all.

In the end, in my opinion, I think The Tommyknockers was one of my favorite novels of his, and I enjoyed reading every second of it. I would rank it as number 3, being IT as number 1 and The Shining as number 2. So, what do you guys think? Do you believe The Tommyknockers was one of Stephen King’s worst novels?

❤ T. A. Nelson

I’m a writer who’s working on books and is in the query trenches. Make sure you’re following me on here as well as on Twitter @WriterInHorror

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Reading Now – The Tommyknockers

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“Stephen King never stops giving us his all” (Chicago Tribune) in this #1 national bestseller about the idyllic small town of Haven, Maine, and its encounter with a deadly evil out for a diabolical invasion of body, soul—and mind.

Something was happening in Bobbi Anderson’s idyllic small town of Haven, Maine. Something that gave every man, woman, and child in Haven powers far beyond those of ordinary mortals. Something that turned the town into a deathtrap for all outsiders. Something that is buried in the woods behind Bobbi’s house. With the help of her friend, Jim Gardener, they uncover an alien spaceship. And as they learn more about this strange discovery, the citizens of Haven begin to change: The townspeople are being welded into one organic, homicidal, and fearsomely brilliant entity in thrall to the Tommyknockers, who piloted the alien ship.

In Tommyknockers, “Stephen King at his best” (San Francisco Chronicle), King has given us a “brilliant, riveting, marvelous” (The Boston Globe) novel. “You will not be able to put this down” (Los Angeles Times Book Review). And the next time someone raps at your door, you may want to keep the chain on. It just might be the Tommyknocker Man.

❤ T. A. Nelson

I am a writer who’s working on books and is seeking representation. Follow me on here to see what I am reading next and follow me on twitter as well @WriterInHorror 

Reading Now

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Immensely helpful and illuminating to any aspiring writer, this special edition of Stephen King’s critically lauded, million-copy bestseller shares the experiences, habits, and convictions that have shaped him and his work.

“Long live the King” hailed Entertainment Weekly upon publication of Stephen King’s On Writing. Part memoir, part master class by one of the bestselling authors of all time, this superb volume is a revealing and practical view of the writer’s craft, comprising the basic tools of the trade every writer must have. King’s advice is grounded in his vivid memories from childhood through his emergence as a writer, from his struggling early career to his widely reported, near-fatal accident in 1999—and how the inextricable link between writing and living spurred his recovery. Brilliantly structured, friendly and inspiring, On Writing will empower and entertain everyone who reads it—fans, writers, and anyone who loves a great story well told.

Book I’m Reading Now

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

An unspeakable crime. A confounding investigation. At a time when the King brand has never been stronger, he has delivered one of his most unsettling and compulsively readable stories.

An eleven-year-old boy’s violated corpse is found in a town park. Eyewitnesses and fingerprints point unmistakably to one of Flint City’s most popular citizens. He is Terry Maitland, Little League coach, English teacher, husband, and father of two girls. Detective Ralph Anderson, whose son Maitland once coached, orders a quick and very public arrest. Maitland has an alibi, but Anderson and the district attorney soon add DNA evidence to go with the fingerprints and witnesses. Their case seems ironclad.

As the investigation expands and horrifying answers begin to emerge, King’s propulsive story kicks into high gear, generating strong tension and almost unbearable suspense. Terry Maitland seems like a nice guy, but is he wearing another face? When the answer comes, it will shock you as only Stephen King can.

Book I’m Reading Now

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The #1 national bestseller about a famous novelist held hostage by his “number one fan” and suffering a frightening case of writer’s block—that could prove fatal. One of “Stephen King’s best…genuinely scary” (USA TODAY).

Paul Sheldon is a bestselling novelist who has finally met his number one fan. Her name is Annie Wilkes, and she is more than a rabid reader—she is Paul’s nurse, tending his shattered body after an automobile accident. But she is also furious that the author has killed off her favorite character in his latest book. Annie becomes his captor, keeping him prisoner in her isolated house.

Annie wants Paul to write a book that brings Misery back to life—just for her. She has a lot of ways to spur him on. One is a needle. Another is an axe. And if they don’t work, she can get really nasty.

❤ T. A. Nelson writer of horror

Follow me on here as well as Twitter @WriterInHorror and Wattpad @livinginmymindgirl